Mobile menu
The interior is almost certainly imaginary (as opposed to being specifically of Whitehall Palace), although the event itself could have been witnessed by Houckgeest, who seems to have been at the English court sometime during the mid-1630s. Charles I owne

The ritual of public dining and its trappings in the time of Charles II

Johann Hass

The Exeter Salt c.1630

Silver gilt and enamel, mounted with almandine garnets, turquoises, sapphires, emeralds, rubies, amethysts | 45.7 cm x 30.2 cm x 30.2 cm (whole object) | RCIN 31772

Jewel House, Jewel House

Your share link is...

  Close

The Exeter Salt was presented to Charles II for his coronation by the former Parliamentarian stronghold of Exeter, possibly as a gift of appeasement. The salt itself was made by Johann Hass of Hamburg in 1630. The purchase of this extremely ornamental object, whose function was to dispense salt and spices, was perhaps a clever choice by the City of Exeter. In 1660 the new king returned home to find that most of his family's collection of high-status objects had been sold and he needed to replace them. The presence of the salt on his table may have been intended to be a continual reminder of Exeter.

Curatorial Introduction

©

Stop Motion

©