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Furniture and Sculpture

Roubiliac made four portraits of Handel, of which the first, the famous statue of the seated figure with Apollo's lyre, commissioned for Vauxhall Gardens and completed in 1738, established the sculptor's reputation. The last was the composer's monument in

George Frederick Handel, (1685-1759) ©

By the 1730s, the Palladian style in architecture had taken hold in Britain and was evident in furniture design. William Kent was the chief designer of furniture in this style, which made use of classical emblems such as shells, lion paws, leopard heads and acanthus leaves as well as incorporating architectural details such as an Ionic capital or the Vitruvian or wave-scroll. Italian sculpture continued to be highly prized and George II acquired two sets of the Four Seasons, one carved in white marble of c.1700, by Camillo Rusconi and another cast in bronze relief by Massimiliano Soldani-Benzi of 1715.

Attributed to Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Mirror

Massimiliano Soldani-Benzi (1656-1740)

The Four Seasons - Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter

Attributed to Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Mirror

Henry Williams (active 1728-38)

Stool

Henry Williams (active 1728-38)

Open armchair

Peter Scheemakers (1691-1781)

Frederick, Prince of Wales

Burkat Shudi (1702-73)

Two-manual harpsichord

Louis-François Roubiliac (1702-62)

George Frederick Handel, (1685-1759)

Probably Richard Roberts (active 1714-29)

Stool

Henry Williams (active 1728-38)

Stool

John Pyke (active 1710-77), Bedford Row

Table clock

? Richard Roberts (active 1714-29)

Stool

Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Pedestal

Attributed to Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Side table

Attributed to Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Side table

Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Pair of stands

Richard Roberts (active 1714-29)

Side chair

Benjamin Goodison (c.1700-1767)

Side table