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A cabinet of curiosities

The innermost cabinet rooms of Queen Caroline’s apartments at Kensington Palace were treated as a Wunderkammer or cabinet of curiosities. The collection included works of art made from exotic materials and natural curiosities, inspired by the cabinets Caroline knew from her childhood in Dresden and Berlin. Traditionally such Wunderkammer often contained classical Roman hardstone carvings and the Queen owned several of exceptional quality.

Northern Italy

Hercules

Bernard Lens III (1682-1740)

George I (1660-1727)

Brunswick-Lüneburg Court miniaturist (c. 1595)

Ernest of Celle, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1497-1546)

Brunswick-Lüneburg Court miniaturist (c. 1595)

Sophia, Duchess of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1508-1541)

Brunswick-Lüneburg Court miniaturist (c. 1595)

William the Younger, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1535-1592)

Brunswick-Lüneburg Court miniaturist (c. 1595)

George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg-Kalenberg (1582-1641)

Bernard Lens III (1682-1740)

Princess Louisa (1724-1751)

Attributed to Ludolf Lafontaine (1704-74)

George I (1660-1727)

Isaac Oliver (c. 1565-1617)

Portrait of the artist

Isaac Oliver (c. 1565-1617)

A Young Man Seated Under a Tree

Peter Oliver (1589-1647)

Portrait of the artist

? Nicholas Dixon (1660-1708)

Mary II (1662-1694)